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1512, 2023

Navigating Changes in Exporting: Updates on UK Import Controls for Goods from Ireland

Navigating Changes in Exporting: Updates on UK Import Controls for Goods from Ireland

Introduction

In a significant development, the UK government has announced new import controls that will impact the movement of goods from Ireland to Great Britain starting on January 31, 2024. These changes, outlined in the UK Border Target Operating Model (TOM), represent a phased approach to implementing controls on goods entering Great Britain from the European Union, including Ireland. As an exporter, it’s crucial to understand these changes and take proactive steps to ensure compliance.

Key Changes and Dates:

  1. January 31, 2024:

    • Imports of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) goods from Ireland to Great Britain (GB) must be pre-notified on the UK’s SPS import system, IPAFFS.
    • Export health certificates and phytosanitary certificates will be required for medium and high risk animal products and plant and plant products imported to GB from the EU.
    • Full customs formalities will apply to goods moving directly from Ireland into GB ports.
     

    Note: UK import declarations must be pre-lodged using the Goods Vehicle Management System (GVMS). Hauliers moving goods through UK ports using GVMS need to register for the service.

  2. April 30, 2024:

    • Documentary and risk-based identity and physical checks will apply to medium-risk animal products, medium-risk plants, medium-risk plant products, and high-risk food and feed of non-animal origin from the EU (excluding Ireland).
    • Existing inspections of high-risk plants and plant products from the EU will shift from destination premises to Border Control Posts (BCPs).
  1. October 31, 2024:

    • Safety and Security declarations for EU imports will come into force.
    • Documentary and risk-based identity and physical checks will apply to medium-risk animal products, medium-risk plants, medium-risk plant products, and high-risk food and feed of non-animal origin from Ireland at ports on the west coast of GB.

Note: The date for the commencement of physical checks for goods moving from the island of Ireland is yet to be confirmed by the UK Government.

What You Need to Do:

  • Speak to all stakeholders in your supply chain, including transport and logistics providers and customers in Great Britain, to assess necessary adjustments for compliance.
  • Irish exporters of agri-food goods should contact their supervisory competent authority to ensure they meet the new UK requirements.

Understanding the Controls: The detailed controls are outlined in the UK Border Target Operating Model. It covers customs, SPS requirements, and other essential information for exporters. You can find more information on the official Gov.uk page.

SPS Controls and Risk Categories: The need for pre-notification on the UK’s IPAFFS for SPS goods depends on the risk category. The UK Government’s website provides detailed information on the risk categories for exports to the UK.

Health Certificates and SPS Controls: New/revised UK Export Health Certificates (EHCs) for EU, including Irish products, were published by the UK’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) on April 28, 2023. These certificates must be used from January 31, 2024. Webinars by the Department of Agriculture Food and Marine explain the new SPS import control requirements in detail. More information is available here.

Key Links and Resources: For further guidance and information, refer to the following key links:

Irish Government Resources:

It’s crucial to stay informed and take proactive measures to ensure a smooth transition through these changes. For specific inquiries or detailed guidance, reach out to the relevant authorities or consult legal experts in international trade.

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1909, 2023

New EU Sanctions on Russian Iron and Steel Imports

New EU Sanctions on Russian Iron & Steel Imports

 

Introduction

In June 2023, the European Union (EU) introduced new sanctions measures aimed at restricting the import of iron and steel products from Russia. These measures come as a response to Russia’s actions, which have contributed to the destabilisation of the situation in Ukraine. It’s essential for businesses involved in importing or dealing with iron and steel products to understand these sanctions to ensure compliance and avoid potential penalties.

In this blog post, we’ll break down the key points from eCustoms Notification 25/2023 and explain what businesses need to do to navigate these new restrictions effectively.

 

Understanding the Sanctions

The new sanctions introduced by the EU are outlined in Council Regulation (EU) 2023/1214. These measures prohibit the import of iron and steel products that either originate in Russia or have been exported from Russia. The specific list of products subject to these sanctions is found in Annex XVII of the Regulation. This Annex corresponds to tariff headings 7206-7229 within Chapter 72, and the full Chapter 73 of the Combined Nomenclature (CN) codes. These sanctions came into effect on September 30, 2023.

The EU has extended this prohibition to include imports or purchases of iron and steel products processed in a third country that incorporate iron and steel products originating in Russia. This extension ensures that the sanctions cover a broader range of products.

 

Key Dates to Remember

For products classified under CN codes 7207 11, the prohibition applies from April 1, 2024. For products classified under CN codes 7207 12 10 and 7224 90, the prohibition becomes effective on October 1, 2024.

 

Importers’ Obligations

Article 3g(1)(d) of the Regulation establishes an obligation for importers in the EU. Importers are required to provide evidence of the country of origin of the iron and steel inputs used in the processing of products in a third country. This evidence is vital to confirm that the primary products used in processing are not of Russian origin.

To meet this obligation, importers should have appropriate documentation ready, and it should be made available to customs if requested. Uploading these documents as supporting evidence at the time of lodging the customs import declaration can help prevent delays in the customs process.

 

Acceptable Documents

Various documents are considered acceptable as evidence of the country of origin of the iron and steel inputs used in processing. These include:

  • Mill Test Certificates
  • Invoices
  • Delivery notes
  • Quality certificates
  • Long-term supplier’s declarations
  • Calculation and production documents
  • Customs documents from the last country where processing occurred
  • Business correspondence
  • Production descriptions
  • Declarations of the manufacturer
  • Exclusion clauses in purchase contracts showing the non-Russian origin of the primary products.

 

Understanding New AIS Codes for Affected Products

In data element 2/03 of the Automated Import System (AIS) import declaration, declarants will use the relevant codes to ensure compliance. Here are some of the codes and their meanings:

  • L139 – Import authorisation by virtue of article 3g.7 of Council Regulation (EU) 833/2014 (Iron and Steel).
  • Y824 – Evidence of the country of origin of the iron and steel inputs used for processing of the product in a third country (Iron and Steel).
  • Y859 – Goods entered the territory of the customs union of the EU and presented to customs authorities before the entry into force or applicability date of the present sanction, whichever is latest (see Article 12e of Regulation (EU) No 833/2014) (Iron and Steel).

 

Next Steps

It’s crucial for businesses importing or dealing with iron and steel products to take these sanctions seriously. The failure to comply with these measures can lead to financial penalties and possible legal action.

As an importer, it’s essential to work closely with your suppliers ensure compliance with these new restrictions. Additionally, maintaining detailed records and collecting the required evidence of origin is a key part of this process.

While the sanctions may pose additional challenges for businesses involved in this industry, understanding and adhering to the regulations is vital to avoid potential issues down the line.

For further guidance, it’s advisable to stay updated on any additional information provided by the European Commission.

 

Conclusion

The new EU sanctions on Russian iron and steel imports have introduced additional requirements for importers. Understanding these sanctions and ensuring compliance will be crucial for businesses dealing with iron and steel products. By following the recommended steps, you can navigate these restrictions effectively and avoid potential penalties. Stay informed and work with your supply chain partners to ensure a smooth transition into this new regulatory landscape.

 

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1403, 2023

Automated Export System (AES): Full Guide

Automated Export System (AES): Full Guide

Irish Revenue has confirmed the new go live date for the introduction of the new national export system, the Automated Export System (AES), which will be operational from 21 March 2023. This system will process export declarations and exit summary declarations for all goods moving directly and indirectly to countries outside the European Union (EU). AES will replace the Automated Entry Processing (AEP) and eManifest system. There will be a two-month migration window for trade to move from AEP and eManifest to AES, and from 22 May 2023, it will not be possible to lodge declarations in the AEP or eManifest systems.


Impact on Trade

The Automated Export System (AES) will bring significant changes to the process of exporting European Union (EU) goods to non-EU countries if you previously used the Automated Entry Processing (AEP) for your export declarations. The new system will require a new data set for the export declaration, which includes some new data elements as specified under the Union Customs Code. AES will also allow the lodging of export declarations up to 30 days before presenting the goods to Customs, and a presentation notification (C2) will be required when the goods are ready to export. Additionally, a re-export notification (A3) will be necessary for goods in temporary storage that are re-exported without being declared for another customs procedure. The process flow to confirm the exit of goods from the EU will also change, and new messages will need to be submitted.


New Process Flow to Confirm Exit from EU

The Automated Export System (AES) will introduce new messages for goods exported from the European Union (EU). These include the ‘Arrival at exit’ message lodged at the office of exit of the goods from the EU, and the ‘Exit notification’ message lodged after the goods have left the EU. The Master Reference Number (MRN) of the export declaration must be included in these messages. Revenue will provide the Export Release Verification Service (ERVS) to allow carriers to check the status of the declaration when goods arrive at the airport or port. Ferry operators will use the Pre-Boarding Notification (PBN) to fulfil the ‘Arrival at exit’ and ‘Exit notification’ message requirements. Revenue will re-use data in the PBN and National Intelligence Management System (NIMS) manifest to fulfil the ‘Exit notification’ message requirement.


Consignments of Low Value

An export declaration is not required for commercial goods valued at less than €1,000 and weighing less than 1,000kg. Also, no export declaration is required for goods in a postal consignment valued at €1,000 or less, and goods in an express consignment valued at €1,000 or less if the required data is available to Revenue. However, goods that are subject to prohibitions and restrictions or are being returned for a duty refund are not exempted from an export declaration.


Conclusion

The implementation of the Automated Export System (AES) in Ireland on 21 March 2023 will streamline the process of exporting goods from the European Union (EU) to non-EU countries. The new system will replace the Automated Entry Processing (AEP) and eManifest system and require a new data set for the export declaration, which includes some new data elements specified under the Union Customs Code (UCC). The AES will also introduce a new process flow to confirm the exit of goods from the EU, with new messages required for goods exported from the EU. However, there are exemptions for commercial goods valued at less than €1,000 and weighing less than 1,000kg, and for goods in a postal or express consignment valued at €1,000 or less. The AES is expected to bring greater efficiency and accuracy to the export process in Ireland, benefiting both traders and the Irish Revenue.

 

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1312, 2022

How to Calculate Import Taxes into Ireland: A Step-by-Step Guide

How to Calculate Import Taxes into Ireland: A Step-by-Step Guide

Ireland, like many other countries, imposes import taxes on certain goods that are imported into the country. These taxes, also known as customs duties or tariffs, are designed to protect domestic industries and generate revenue for the government. If you’re importing goods into Ireland, it’s important to understand how import taxes are calculated so that you can accurately estimate the cost of your shipment. In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at how to calculate import taxes into Ireland.

 

Step 1: Determine the HS Code for your goods

The first step in calculating import taxes into Ireland is to determine the HS Code for your goods. The Harmonised System (HS) is an international system used to classify goods for customs purposes. Each product is assigned a unique HS Code, which is a six-digit code that is used to determine the applicable tariff rate.

To find the HS Code for your goods, you can use TARIC by clicking here. Click on ‘Browse the Nomenclature’ and review the various chapter headings to see which code is appropriate for your products. If you are struggling to classify your goods you can always contact Beagans Limited who will be happy to assist you in getting an accurate classification of your goods.

 

Step 2: Determine the applicable tariff rate

Once you have determined the HS Code for your goods, you can use the Irish Revenue website to determine the applicable tariff rate. Ireland, like other countries, has a schedule of tariff rates that apply to different types of goods.

To find the applicable tariff rate for your goods, you will need to know the country of origin of the goods (i.e., the country where they were manufactured). The tariff rate will vary depending on the country of origin, the type of product, and other factors.

 

Step 3: Calculate the duty payable

Once you have determined the applicable tariff rate, you can calculate the duty payable on your goods. The duty payable is calculated as a percentage of the value of the goods, including the cost of shipping and insurance.

To calculate the duty payable, multiply the value of the goods by the applicable tariff rate (expressed as a percentage). For example, if the value of your goods is €1,000 and the applicable tariff rate is 5%, the duty payable would be €50.

 

Step 4: Add VAT and any other charges

In addition to customs duties, you may also be required to pay Value Added Tax (VAT) on your imported goods. The VAT rate in Ireland is currently 23%, although there are certain goods and services that are exempt or subject to a reduced rate.

To calculate the VAT payable, add the value of the goods, the customs duty payable, and any other charges and then multiply by the VAT rate. For example, if the value of your goods is €1,000, the customs duty payable is €50, and there are no other charges, the total amount payable would be €1,291.50 (€1,000 + €50 duty + €241.50 VAT).

 

Step 5: Pay the import taxes

Once you have calculated the import taxes payable, you will need to pay them to the Irish Revenue. This is done by Beagans Limited by completing a Customs Declaration form and submitting it to the Revenue Commissioners.

It’s important to note that failure to pay the appropriate import taxes can result in penalties and delays in releasing your goods. It’s therefore essential to ensure that you have accurately calculated the import taxes and paid them on time.

 

Conclusion

Calculating import taxes into Ireland involves determining the HS Code for your goods, determining the applicable tariff rate, calculating the duty payable, adding VAT and any other charges, and then paying the import taxes to the Irish Revenue. While the process may seem daunting, there are many resources available to help you navigate the process and ensure that you have accurately calculated the import taxes and paid them on time.

It’s important to note that the import tax rates and rules are subject to change, so it’s crucial to stay updated with the latest information. Additionally, seeking the assistance of a customs broker or freight forwarder can help simplify the process and ensure that all requirements are met.

By following this guide, you can ensure a successful import process into Ireland and avoid any unnecessary complications. With accurate calculations and timely payments, you can navigate the import process with confidence and focus on growing your business.

 

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311, 2022

EU Quotas: The Ultimate Guide

EU Quotas: The Ultimate Guide 

If you’re involved in importing goods into Ireland from countries outside the European Union (EU), you need to be aware of EU quotas. Quotas are trade restrictions that limit the amount of certain goods that can be imported into the EU each year. These quotas are put in place to protect EU industries and prevent the importation of goods that may harm EU producers.

 

Why are EU quotas important?

EU quotas are important because they can have a significant impact on the cost and availability of goods in the EU market. Quotas can limit the amount of goods that can be imported into the EU, which can cause prices to rise and create supply chain disruptions. As an importer, it’s essential to understand EU quotas and how they may affect your business.

 

How are EU quotas determined?

EU quotas are determined by the EU and its member states, who negotiate with third countries to establish quotas for specific goods. These quotas can be based on a variety of factors, including historical trade volumes, production levels, and the potential impact on EU producers.

Once a quota is established, it is managed by the European Commission, which monitors imports and ensures that the quota is not exceeded. If the quota is exceeded, the EU may impose additional duties or penalties on the excess imports.

 

How can importers comply with EU quotas?

To comply with EU quotas, importers must:

Monitor their imports: Importers must track their imports and ensure that they do not exceed the quota limit for a specific product.

Submit import licenses: For some products, importers must submit an import license application to the relevant authorities. The import license will specify the quantity of the product that can be imported, and failure to obtain the appropriate license can result in penalties or fines.

Pay applicable duties: If the quota limit is exceeded, importers must pay the applicable duties or face additional penalties.

Keep up-to-date with changes: Importers must stay informed of any changes to EU quotas and adjust their import activities accordingly.

 

Conclusion

EU quotas are trade restrictions that limit the amount of certain goods that can be imported into the EU each year. Importers must be aware of these quotas and comply with their requirements to avoid penalties and ensure a smooth import process. By monitoring their imports, submitting import licenses, paying applicable duties, and staying informed of changes, importers can navigate the complexities of EU quotas and maintain compliance with EU regulations.

 

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1310, 2022

Tariff Classification

The Importance of Correct Tariff Classification

If you are involved in importing goods into Ireland, one of the most important things you need to consider is tariff classification. Tariff classification is the process of determining the correct tariff code for a particular product, which is then used to calculate the applicable duty rate and taxes that must be paid upon importation.

 

Why is tariff classification important?

Tariff classification is important for a number of reasons, including:

Compliance with Customs Regulations: Correct tariff classification is required to ensure compliance with customs regulations, including the payment of applicable duties and taxes, and to avoid potential penalties for non-compliance.

Accurate Pricing: Correct tariff classification is essential for accurate pricing of goods, as it enables the importer to determine the correct duty and tax costs associated with the importation of a particular product.

Customs Clearance: Correct tariff classification is required to facilitate customs clearance, as customs officials will use the tariff code to identify the appropriate documentation and procedures for clearance.

Trade Statistics: Correct tariff classification is also important for trade statistics, as it enables governments to track the import and export of specific products and to assess the economic impact of trade policies.

 

How is tariff classification determined?

Tariff classification is determined by the Harmonized System (HS) code, which is an internationally recognised system for classifying goods. The HS code consists of a six-digit number, which is used to identify the general category of goods, followed by additional digits to provide a more detailed description of the product.

To determine the correct HS code for a particular product, importers must consider a number of factors, including:

Product Composition: The composition of the product, including materials, chemicals, and components, can impact the HS code.

Product Function: The function of the product, including its intended use, can also impact the HS code.

Product Packaging: The type of packaging used for the product can also impact the HS code.

Country of Origin: The country of origin of the product can impact the HS code, as some products may be subject to additional tariffs or restrictions based on their country of origin.

 

How can importers ensure correct tariff classification?

To ensure correct tariff classification, importers can take the following steps:

Seek Professional Advice: Importers can seek the advice of customs brokers, trade consultants, or legal advisors to ensure correct tariff classification.

Research: Importers can research the HS code for their product using online resources such as the World Customs Organisation website or the Irish Revenue Commissioners website.

Submit Sample or Prototype: Importers can submit a sample or prototype of their product to the customs authorities for classification.

Conduct Internal Review: Importers can conduct an internal review of their product to determine the correct HS code, using factors such as composition, function, packaging, and country of origin.

 

Conclusion

Correct tariff classification is essential for importing goods into Ireland and undergoing customs clearance. By ensuring correct tariff classification, importers can avoid potential penalties for non-compliance, accurately price their goods, facilitate customs clearance, and contribute to accurate trade statistics. Importers can ensure correct tariff classification by seeking professional advice, conducting research, submitting a sample or prototype, or conducting an internal review of their product. 

 

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1109, 2022

ATA Carnet: The Ultimate Guide

ATA Carnet: The Ultimate Guide

If you’re planning on temporarily exporting goods from Ireland, an ATA Carnet can simplify the customs procedures and save you time and money. In this guide, we’ll explain what an ATA Carnet is, how to apply for one in Ireland, the various uses of the document, and any other relevant information you need to know.


What is an ATA Carnet?

An ATA Carnet (Admission Temporaire / Temporary Admission) is an international customs document that allows the temporary importation of goods into foreign countries without paying duties and taxes or having to go through complicated customs procedures. An ATA Carnet covers a wide range of goods, such as commercial samples, professional equipment, and goods for exhibitions and fairs.

ATA Carnets were introduced in 1961 and are administered by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) and the World Customs Organization (WCO). They are recognised by over 80 countries, including the United States, Canada, Australia, and most of Europe.


What is the purpose of an ATA Carnet?

The purpose of an ATA Carnet is to simplify and speed up the customs procedures for temporary exports of goods. The document serves as a guarantee that the goods will be re-exported within the specified time frame and will not be sold or consumed in the importing country.

An ATA Carnet also eliminates the need to pay duties and taxes or obtain temporary import permits for each country the goods will enter, which can save time and money for the exporter.


What goods can be covered by an ATA Carnet?

An ATA Carnet can cover a wide range of goods, including:

Commercial samples: Products that are not for resale and are used to promote or test a product.

Professional equipment: Tools and equipment that are used for work purposes, such as cameras, computers, and musical instruments.

Goods for exhibitions and fairs: Products that are displayed at trade shows, exhibitions, or fairs.

Other temporary exports: Any other goods that are intended for temporary use outside of Ireland.


How long is an ATA Carnet valid?

An ATA Carnet is valid for one year from the date of issue and can be used for multiple trips within that time frame. The goods covered by the Carnet must be re-exported within the specified time frame, and any extensions must be approved by the issuing authority.


How to apply for an ATA Carnet in Ireland?

To apply for an ATA Carnet in Ireland, you need to follow these steps:

– Contact the local Chamber of Commerce or the authorized ATA Carnet issuing authority in Ireland, such as the Irish Exporters Association or the Dublin Chamber of Commerce.

– Provide information about the goods you intend to export, such as the description, value, and purpose of use.

– Provide information about the countries you will be visiting and the duration of the trip.

– Pay the fees associated with the Carnet, which include a bond or a cash deposit to cover any potential customs duties or taxes if the goods are not re-exported within the specified time frame.

– Obtain the ATA Carnet document, which includes a cover page, a list of goods covered by the Carnet, and customs vouchers that must be stamped by the customs authorities at each border crossing.


What are the various uses of an ATA Carnet?

An ATA Carnet can be used for various purposes, such as:

– Participating in trade shows and exhibitions

– Conducting business meetings or seminars

– Filming movies or TV shows

– Performing arts or sports events

– Temporary exports of professional equipment for work purposes


What other information do you need to know about ATA Carnets?

It’s important to note that an ATA Carnet is not a replacement for other required documents, such as export licenses or health licenses and other health department controls. 

 

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101, 2022

BREXIT: Effects on Trade One Year Later

BREXIT: Effects on Trade One Year Later  

It has been over a year since the United Kingdom (UK) officially left the European Union (EU) on December 31, 2020. The impact of BREXIT on international trade has been significant, with changes in trade relations, tariffs, and regulations affecting businesses and industries across the globe. In this article, we will examine the effects of BREXIT on international trade one year after the official exit.

 

Trade Relations

The UK’s exit from the EU has affected trade relations between the two entities. After BREXIT, the UK became a third country for the EU, meaning that trade between the UK and the EU is now subject to customs procedures, tariffs, and other regulatory requirements. This has resulted in additional costs and delays for businesses involved in cross-border trade, with some companies relocating their operations to the EU to avoid these issues.

 

Tariffs

One of the most significant impacts of BREXIT on international trade has been the introduction of tariffs. If the UK and the EU do not reach a free trade agreement, the UK will be subject to the World Trade Organization (WTO) rules, which include tariffs on certain goods. This has resulted in increased costs for businesses, which has been felt across a range of industries, including agriculture, manufacturing, and automotive.

 

Regulatory Changes

BREXIT has also led to regulatory changes, with the UK no longer being subject to EU regulations. This has led to some divergence between the UK and the EU in terms of regulations, which has affected businesses involved in cross-border trade. For example, the UK’s decision to diverge from EU regulations on food safety has led to delays in the export of certain products, such as shellfish, from the UK to the EU.

 

Supply Chain Disruptions

Another impact of BREXIT on international trade has been supply chain disruptions. The introduction of customs procedures and other regulatory requirements has led to delays at borders and ports, which has affected the flow of goods between the UK and the EU. This has had a knock-on effect on businesses that rely on just-in-time delivery, with some companies stockpiling goods to avoid disruptions.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, one year after the UK’s official exit from the EU, the impact of BREXIT on international trade has been significant. Changes in trade relations, tariffs, and regulations have affected businesses across a range of industries, resulting in increased costs, delays, and supply chain disruptions. As the UK and the EU continue to negotiate their future trade relationship, businesses must remain vigilant and adapt to the changing landscape of international trade. This may include reviewing supply chain processes, developing contingency plans, and engaging with customs agents to simplify their customs clearance processes.

 

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901, 2021

Arab-Irish Certificates of Origin: Explained

Arab-Irish Certificates of Origin: Explained

 

The Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin is a vital document for companies involved in trade between Ireland and the Arab world. It is a legal document that certifies the country of origin of the goods being exported from Ireland to the Arab world. In this blog post, we will provide a comprehensive guide to understanding the Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin, its importance, and the process of obtaining it.


What is the Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin?

The Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin is a document that certifies the origin of goods that are exported from Ireland to the Arab world. This certificate is an important legal document that provides evidence of the country of origin of the goods. It is required by customs authorities in the Arab world as a condition for allowing the entry of goods into their countries.

The Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin contains information such as the name and address of the exporter, the description of the goods, the country of origin, and the value of the goods. This information is critical in determining the tariff and taxes that need to be paid on the imported goods.


Why is the Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin Important?

The Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin is critical for companies involved in international trade as it facilitates the smooth movement of goods between countries. It is a legal document that provides evidence of the country of origin of the goods being exported, which is essential for complying with regulatory requirements and customs regulations.

The Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin also helps to protect the interests of both the exporter and importer. For the exporter, it ensures that their goods are not mislabeled as originating from another country, which could result in legal liabilities. For the importer, it provides assurance that the goods they are importing are of the quality and origin they expect.


Process of Obtaining the Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin

The process of obtaining the Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin involves several steps. Firstly, the exporter must provide all the necessary documentation to Beagans Limited, which includes the commercial invoice, packing list, and bill of lading.

Beagans Limited will then verify the information provided and issue the Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin. The certificate will then be signed and stamped by the Chamber of Commerce, indicating that the goods are of Irish origin and comply with all relevant regulations.

It is important to note that the Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin must be presented to the customs authorities in the Arab world when the goods arrive at their destination. Failure to provide this document can result in delays, fines, and even the seizure of goods.


Other Considerations

While the Arab-Irish Certificate of Origin is an essential document for businesses engaged in trade between Ireland and the Arab world, it is important to take into account the various considerations and potential challenges involved in obtaining and using this document. By staying informed and taking a proactive approach to compliance, companies can ensure that they are able to navigate the regulatory landscape effectively and maintain successful business operations.


Beagans Limited is a trusted provider of Arab-Irish Certificates of Origin and
has been helping Irish exporters to navigate the complexities of international
trade for over 70 years. 

Contact us today to request your Arab-Irish Certificates of Origin.


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401, 2021

Vehicle Registration Tax (VRT): The Ultimate Guide

Vehicle Registration Tax (VRT): The Ultimate Guide

Vehicle Registration Tax (VRT) is a tax that applies to cars, motorbikes, and other vehicles imported into Ireland. The purpose of this tax is to help fund public services such as road maintenance and public transport. In this blog post, we will provide you with an overview of what VRT is, how it affects you, how to check the rate of VRT on a car, and how to pay it to the Irish Revenue.

 

What is Vehicle Registration Tax (VRT)?

VRT is a tax that is payable when a vehicle is first registered in Ireland. The tax is based on the Open Market Selling Price (OMSP) of the vehicle, which is the price that the vehicle would sell for on the open market. The VRT rate is calculated as a percentage of the OMSP, and the rate varies depending on the CO2 emissions of the vehicle.

 

How does VRT affect you?

If you are importing a vehicle into Ireland, you will be required to pay VRT before you can register the vehicle. The amount of VRT you will have to pay depends on the OMSP of the vehicle and the VRT rate. Failure to pay the VRT can result in penalties and the seizure of the vehicle.

 

How can you check the rate of VRT on a car?

The VRT rate for a vehicle is determined by its CO2 emissions. You can find the CO2 emissions of a vehicle on the Certificate of Conformity, which is issued by the manufacturer. The VRT rate can be calculated using the VRT calculator on the Revenue website (https://www.ros.ie/evrt-enquiry/vrtenquiry.html). You will need to enter the make and model of the vehicle, its engine size, fuel type, and CO2 emissions. The VRT calculator will then provide you with the estimated VRT that you will have to pay.

 

How do you pay VRT to the Irish Revenue?

To pay VRT, you will need to complete a VRT Declaration Form, which can be obtained from the NCTS (National Car Testing Service) or downloaded from the Revenue website (https://www.revenue.ie/en/importing-vehicles-duty-free-allowances-and-forms/forms/vrt-forms.aspx). The form requires you to provide information about the vehicle, its OMSP, and the VRT rate. Once you have completed the form, you can submit it to the NCTS along with the payment for the VRT. You will then receive a VRT receipt, which you will need to present when you register the vehicle.

 

Conclusion

Vehicle Registration Tax (VRT) is a tax that is payable when a vehicle is first registered in Ireland. The VRT rate is calculated based on the Open Market Selling Price (OMSP) of the vehicle, which is the price that the vehicle would sell for on the open market. The rate varies depending on the CO2 emissions of the vehicle. To pay VRT, you will need to complete a VRT Declaration Form, which can be obtained from the NCTS or downloaded from the Revenue website. You will also need to submit payment for the VRT, and once this is done, you will receive a VRT receipt, which you will need to present when you register the vehicle.

 

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