News

/News
1501, 2020

BREXIT: Potential Implications on Trade

BREXIT: Potential Implications on Trade

The decision of the United Kingdom (UK) to leave the European Union (EU) – commonly known as BREXIT – has the potential to impact trade between the UK and Ireland significantly. As Irelands leading customs agent, We have been monitoring the developments of the BREXIT negotiations and the potential implications on trade from the perspective of the customs clearance process. In this article, I will outline the potential implications of BREXIT on trade between the UK and Ireland.

 

Customs Clearance

One of the most significant implications of BREXIT on trade between the UK and Ireland is the requirement for customs clearance. Before BREXIT, goods could be freely moved between the UK and Ireland without the need for customs clearance. After BREXIT, customs clearance will be required for all goods moving between the two countries. This will result in additional paperwork, delays, and costs for businesses involved in cross-border trade.

 

Tariffs and Quotas

Another potential implication of BREXIT on trade between the UK and Ireland is the introduction of tariffs and quotas. If the UK and the EU do not reach a free trade agreement, the UK will be treated as a third country, and tariffs and quotas may apply to goods moving between the two countries. This could result in higher prices for consumers, supply chain disruptions, and a reduction in trade between the UK and Ireland.

 

Regulatory Differences

BREXIT also has the potential to impact trade between the UK and Ireland due to regulatory differences. After BREXIT, the UK will no longer be subject to EU regulations, which could result in regulatory divergence between the two countries. This could make it more challenging for businesses to trade between the UK and Ireland, particularly if there are significant regulatory differences in areas such as product safety, labeling, and standards.

 

Border Controls

The reintroduction of border controls is another potential implication of BREXIT on trade between the UK and Ireland. The introduction of border controls could lead to delays at the border and increase the cost of doing business for companies involved in cross-border trade. Border controls could also impact the movement of people between the UK and Ireland, particularly if there are changes to the Common Travel Area (CTA) agreement.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, the potential implications of BREXIT on trade between the UK and Ireland are significant. Customs clearance, tariffs and quotas, regulatory differences, and border controls are all potential challenges that businesses involved in cross-border trade may face. As a customs agent, I advise businesses to prepare for the potential implications of BREXIT on trade between the UK and Ireland and to take steps to mitigate the risks associated with these changes. This could include reviewing supply chain processes, developing contingency plans, and engaging with customs agents to ensure a smooth transition post-BREXIT.

 

All services provided by Beagans Limited can be found here!

Contact Details:

Email:

clearance@beagans.com

1810, 2019

The Northern Ireland Protocol: Explained

The Northern Ireland Protocol: Explained

What is the Northern Ireland Protocol and how does it affect trade between the UK and the EU?

The Northern Ireland Protocol is a key part of the Brexit agreement negotiated between the UK and the EU in 2019. It was created to avoid a hard border between Northern Ireland (which is part of the UK) and the Republic of Ireland (which is a member of the EU), as this would have gone against the terms of the Good Friday Agreement which ended the conflict in Northern Ireland.

Under the Northern Ireland Protocol, Northern Ireland remains part of the UK’s customs territory, but it also follows some of the EU’s rules and regulations to ensure that trade between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland can continue smoothly. This means that goods entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales) are subject to some checks and controls to ensure that they comply with EU regulations.

Some of the key provisions of the Northern Ireland Protocol include:

– Northern Ireland remains part of the UK’s customs territory, but is also subject to some EU customs rules.

– Goods moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland are subject to checks and controls at the point of entry into Northern Ireland, to ensure that they meet EU standards.

– Some goods are subject to additional checks and controls, depending on their type and destination. For example, food products moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland are subject to additional checks and controls to ensure that they meet EU standards.

– Northern Ireland is part of the EU’s VAT area, which means that VAT is charged on goods moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland.

Overall, the Northern Ireland Protocol is intended to ensure that trade between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland can continue smoothly, while also avoiding the need for a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. However, the implementation of the protocol has been controversial, with some businesses and politicians in Northern Ireland arguing that it has created additional bureaucracy and costs.

One of the main issues with the Northern Ireland Protocol has been the impact on trade between Northern Ireland and Great Britain. Some businesses have reported increased costs and delays as a result of the additional checks and controls on goods moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland. This has led to calls for changes to the protocol or even for its removal altogether.

Another issue has been the impact on the political situation in Northern Ireland. Some unionist politicians in Northern Ireland have criticized the protocol, arguing that it undermines Northern Ireland’s status as part of the UK. There have also been concerns that the protocol could create new tensions between unionist and nationalist communities in Northern Ireland.

Despite these concerns, the UK and the EU have committed to finding ways to implement the protocol in a way that minimizes disruption and supports trade between Northern Ireland and both Great Britain and the Republic of Ireland. This could involve changes to the way the protocol is implemented, or the negotiation of additional agreements to address specific issues.

In conclusion, the Northern Ireland Protocol is a key part of the Brexit agreement that is intended to ensure that trade between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland can continue smoothly, while also avoiding the need for a hard border. While the implementation of the protocol has been controversial, both the UK and the EU are committed to finding ways to make it work for all parties involved.


All services provided by Beagans Limited can be found here!

Contact Details:

Email:

clearance@beagans.com

1009, 2019

Incoterms 2020: The Ultimate Guide

Incoterms 2020: The Ultimate Guide

 

International commercial transactions are facilitated by globally recognised commercial terms known as Incoterms. These terms define the responsibilities of buyers and sellers in international trade, and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) has published Incoterms since 1936. The latest version, Incoterms 2020, was published on September 10, 2019. In this blog post, we will provide an overview of the Incoterms 2020.

 

What are Incoterms?

Incoterms are standard trade terms used in international trade contracts to define the responsibilities of buyers and sellers regarding the delivery of goods. These terms specify who is responsible for paying for transportation, insurance, taxes, customs clearance, and other expenses related to the shipment of goods. Incoterms are not laws, but they are recognised and used by businesses and governments worldwide.

 

What’s New in Incoterms 2020?

Incoterms 2020 introduced several changes and updates to the previous version, Incoterms 2010. Here are the significant changes:

New Incoterms Rules: The Incoterms 2020 introduced a new Incoterm, known as Delivered at Place Unloaded (DPU). This term replaces the previous term, Delivered at Terminal (DAT).

Arranging Transport and Insurance: Under the Incoterms 2020, buyers and sellers must agree on who will arrange transport and insurance for the goods. The Incoterms also provide guidance on how to handle these arrangements.

Security Requirements: The Incoterms 2020 provide guidance on security requirements related to the shipment of goods, such as cargo inspection, packaging, and labeling.

Bills of Lading: The Incoterms 2020 clarify the responsibilities of buyers and sellers regarding the bills of lading, which is a document that provides evidence of the contract of carriage.

Cost Allocation: The Incoterms 2020 provide clear guidance on cost allocation related to the shipment of goods, such as loading and unloading costs, customs duties, and taxes.

 

Incoterms 2020 Rules

The Incoterms 2020 are divided into two groups based on the mode of transport used:

 

Incoterms for any mode of transport:

EXW (Ex Works)

FCA (Free Carrier)

CPT (Carriage Paid To)

CIP (Carriage and Insurance Paid To)

DPU (Delivered at Place Unloaded)

DAP (Delivered at Place)

DDP (Delivered Duty Paid)

 

Incoterms for sea and inland waterway transport:

FAS (Free Alongside Ship)

FOB (Free on Board)

CFR (Cost and Freight)

CIF (Cost, Insurance, and Freight)

Conclusion

 

Conclusion

Incoterms 2020 are a set of globally recognised commercial terms used in international trade to define the responsibilities of buyers and sellers regarding the delivery of goods. These terms were updated in 2020 to provide more clarity and guidance on issues such as security requirements, bills of lading, cost allocation, and arrangements for transport and insurance. Understanding and using Incoterms can help businesses avoid misunderstandings and disputes in international trade contracts.

 

All services provided by Beagans Limited can be found here!

Contact Details:

Email:

clearance@beagans.com

703, 2019

Irish Customs Regulations

Understanding Customs Regulations in Ireland

Customs regulations in Ireland are a critical aspect of international trade. As a member of the European Union (EU), Ireland has specific customs regulations that apply to imports and exports between Ireland and other EU member states, as well as regulations that apply to trade with non-EU countries. Understanding these regulations is essential for businesses involved in international trade to ensure compliance and avoid penalties and delays. In this blog post, we will explore in-depth the basics of customs regulations specific to Ireland, including what they are, why they exist, and how they impact businesses.

 

What are Customs Regulations in Ireland?

Customs regulations in Ireland are a set of rules and procedures that govern the movement of goods across international borders. The regulations are designed to protect public health, safety, and the environment, as well as to ensure that appropriate revenues are collected for goods entering and leaving the country. The regulations apply to businesses that import or export goods to and from Ireland, as well as to transport companies that move goods across borders.

 

Why do Customs Regulations Exist in Ireland?

Customs regulations in Ireland exist for several reasons. First and foremost, they are designed to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Customs regulations ensure that goods entering the country meet certain standards, such as product safety and quality standards. They also help to prevent the importation of dangerous or harmful goods. Additionally, customs regulations exist to protect national security and to prevent illegal trade. Finally, customs regulations are in place to ensure that appropriate revenues are collected for goods entering and leaving the country, through the collection of import duties and value-added tax (VAT) on imported goods.

 

How do Customs Regulations Impact Businesses in Ireland?

Customs regulations can have a significant impact on businesses involved in international trade. To comply with customs regulations in Ireland, businesses must complete customs declarations and provide documentation to support the shipment of goods. Failure to comply with these regulations can result in delays in the movement of goods or fines and penalties.

To comply with customs regulations in Ireland, businesses must have a good understanding of the specific requirements for their products and the countries they are trading with. This may include understanding product standards, tariffs, and licensing requirements, as well as customs procedures and documentation requirements. Businesses may also need to work with customs brokers or freight forwarders to ensure compliance with regulations and to facilitate the movement of goods across borders.

In addition to complying with customs regulations when importing or exporting goods, businesses in Ireland must also comply with other regulations that may impact their operations. These may include regulations related to product safety, environmental standards, and employment laws.


Conclusion

Customs regulations in Ireland are a critical consideration for businesses involved in international trade. Understanding these regulations, including what they are, why they exist, and how they impact businesses, is essential for compliance and successful trade. By working with Beagans Limited your Customs Broker and staying up to date on regulatory changes, businesses can navigate customs regulations in Ireland and ensure the smooth movement of goods across borders.

 

All services provided by Beagans Limited can be found here!

Contact Details:

Email:

clearance@beagans.com

2703, 2018

European Union (EU) Certificates of Origin: Explained

European Union (EU) Certificates of Origin: Explained 

If you are an Irish exporter, it is essential to understand the role of EU certificates of origin. A certificate of origin is an official document that identifies the origin of goods. It is required by customs authorities in the destination country to determine the correct rate of duty and tax to be applied to imported goods. In this blog post, we will explore EU certificates of origin, their importance for Irish exporters, and the process of obtaining them.


What is an EU Certificate of Origin?

An EU certificate of origin is a document that certifies that a particular export product was manufactured, produced or processed in a specific country. This document is required by customs authorities in the importing country to determine the origin of the goods and to apply the correct rate of duty and tax.

EU certificates of origin are issued by authorised bodies, such as Chambers of Commerce or other trade associations. The certification process involves verifying the information provided by the exporter, such as the origin of the goods, the value, and the weight of the products, as well as any other necessary details.


Why are EU Certificates of Origin important for Irish exporters?

Irish exporters need EU certificates of origin to export goods to countries outside of the EU. Without this document, the customs authorities in the importing country may not allow the goods to enter, or they may impose a higher rate of duty and tax. This can make the export of goods more expensive and less competitive.

Furthermore, EU certificates of origin are required to qualify for preferential trade agreements, such as the EU’s Generalized System of Preferences (GSP). These agreements offer reduced or zero tariff rates for exports from developing countries and can provide Irish exporters with a competitive advantage.


How to obtain an EU Certificate of Origin?

To obtain an EU certificate of origin, Irish exporters must apply to an authorised issuing body, such as Beagans Limited. The application process usually involves providing information about the goods, such as their origin, value, and weight.

The issuing body will then verify the information and issue the certificate if all requirements are met. 


Conclusion

In summary, EU certificates of origin are essential for Irish exporters to ensure the smooth and cost-effective export of goods to countries outside of the EU. They are required by customs authorities to determine the correct rate of duty and tax and are necessary to qualify for preferential trade agreements. To obtain an EU certificate of origin, Irish exporters must apply to an authorized issuing body and provide the necessary information about the goods.

 

Beagans Limited is a trusted provider of European Union (EU) Certificates of Origin and
has been helping Irish exporters to navigate the complexities of international
trade for over 70 years. 

Contact us today to request your European Union (EU) Certificates of Origin.


All services provided by Beagans Limited can be found here!

Contact Details:

Email:

clearance@beagans.com